German School of Music Weimar student finds success in Europe

Flutist Kim Kyoung performs Philippe Gaubert's "Andante Pastoral et Scherzettino" with pianist Lee Sang-ri at the German School of Music Weimar. (PHOTO: Charles Ian Chun)

Flutist Kim Kyoung performs Philippe Gaubert’s “Andante Pastoral et Scherzettino” with pianist Lee Sang-ri at the German School of Music Weimar
(PHOTOS: Charles Ian Chun)

It has been a banner year for flutist Kim Kyoung. This past March at the Davorin Jenko International Competition in Belgrade, she competed with over 100 contestants to win first prize in her category, earning a score of 98.20. She has also been given a 1-year position with Jungen Ensemble Philharmonie Staatstheater Mainz, a major opera company in Germany.

On August 9, she returned to Kangnam University to share her knowledge and offer guidance to flute students during a Masterclass at the German School of Music Weimar, where she studied from 2005 to 2008 under Professors Hartmut Gerhold and Philipp Jundt.

Kim preceded the Masterclass with short concert, giving energetic performances of Philippe Gaubert’s “Andante Pastoral et Scherzettino”, Toshi Ichinayagi’s “In a Living Memory”, and Friedrich Kuhlau’s “Introduction et Rondo”.

Kim Kyoung performs Toshi Ichinayagi's "In a Living Memory" for flute solo. (PHOTO: Charles Ian Chun)

Kim Kyoung performs Toshi Ichinayagi’s “In a Living Memory” for flute solo.

The performance was followed by a Q&A session during which Kim advised students who wish to pursue their careers in Germany to master their German while in Korea, as they won’t have the time to do so once they get there. Kim also argued that while Korean classical musicians demonstrate great technical ability, they’re often lacking in musicality — something that cannot be gained by practicing alone in one’s room, but by going out and taking in culture, such as at operas.

Kim Kyoung answers students' questions during a Masterclass as Prof. Philipp Jundt moderates. (PHOTO: Charles Ian Chun)

Kim Kyoung answers students’ questions during a Masterclass as Prof. Philipp Jundt moderates.

Professor Jundt is not surprised by Kim’s success. He describes her playing style as a “dark” one well suited to Europe. He also remembers her as a “stubborn” student, though he suggests that may be why she has been able to do so well.

Kim Kyoung coaches 3rd-year student Lee Jung-yoon. (PHOTO: Charles Ian Chun)

Kim Kyoung coaches 3rd-year student Lee Jung-yoon.

Kim Kyoung and 3rd-year student Park Hye-sun. (PHOTO: Charles Ian Chun)

Kim Kyoung and 3rd-year student Park Hye-sun.

Charles Ian Chun

Editor and web designer, The Kangnam Hakbo (English). Instructor, Department of Liberal Arts.

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